New Year's Resolution
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Choose One Word in 2017. Ours is Discernment.

New Year’s Resolutions

New year’s resolutions have been around since the time of the Babylonians, some 4000 years ago. In fact, the Babylonians were the first to hold recorded parties to bring in the new year. The famous ball in New York has been dropping since 1907. Throughout the ages, many cultures have recognized the new year as a time to reflect on the past, make plans, and improve for the future. However, the problem with new year’s resolutions is they are usually over arching and difficult to stick with for the whole year. Instead of having a lot of goals, pare it down to just one word in 2017. Ours is Discernment.

Word of the Year

This idea has spreading online since 2009 when #OneWord365 launched the concept. The premise is to choose just one word to focus on in all aspects of your life. “One word you can focus on every day, all year long… One word that sums up who you want to be or how you want to live. It will take intentionality and commitment, but if you let it, your one word will shape not only your year, but also you. It will become the compass that directs your decisions and guides your steps.”

Discernment

Our One Word for 2017 is “discernment”. Not the most common word, but for a small business, an important one. Discernment means “to the ability to judge well; the quality of being able to grasp and comprehend what is obscure”. With the hyper speed of social media, it is hard to discern reality. We see things through Instagram filters. Discernment means to see through that, through the obscurity, to the truth. Therefore, it is a lens to view reality and make quality decisions; act on those decisions and move forward in integrity on a foundation of facts.

Discerning Steps

How do we go about discerning? There are a few things to practice to be more discerning.

  1. Slow down: It takes time to mentally process information and make solid logical decisions.
  2. Gather facts: Due diligence is important when discerning situations. Take a look at all the angles. When making decisions, put together a pro/con list to help remove bias.
  3. Be open to constructive criticism: It is hard to be discerning in a bubble. Be open to the good and the bad. No one likes to be wrong, but sometimes it is necessary to hear the bad in order to course correct.
  4. Necessary Endings: Take time to process all the possible outcomes, and realize ending something may be the best long term decision.
  5. Recognize mistakes and wrong decisions will happen: It is called being human. This does not mean we can justify our mistakes or not take responsibility for them. Just the opposite. Recognize that mistakes will happen; be willing to own up to them, and make the necessary changes.